The Digital Unification of Multilingual Data: Multiple Options

Unicode is a wonderful thing, but it has not solved all the problems of incorporating multiple languages into digital history.  I do not wish to sell it short!  Before Unicode, there was a choice to be made, with neither option good.  Either one wrote languages in Latin script (perhaps with addition of diacritic dots to … More The Digital Unification of Multilingual Data: Multiple Options

Named Concepts Between Reality and Imagination: Syriaca.org’s Approaches to Historical Places and Persons

(This is a talk I gave as part of the Global Philology Project’s Named Entities workshop in Leipzig in January 2017.) As some of you are already well aware, Syriaca.org is a suite of digital reference works for the study of cultural heritage linked to the Syriac language.  I am the lead co-editor of the … More Named Concepts Between Reality and Imagination: Syriaca.org’s Approaches to Historical Places and Persons

Beyond Gadgetology: Basic Concepts for Assessing the Limitations of Digital Methods

For the workshop day preceding OSU’s first THATCamp, I led a discussion about how humanities scholars can critique digital approaches to our disciplines.  I introduced five basic concepts, and looked at a few projects.  I have posted the concepts here (lightly defined but not fully explained).  Emphasis is on the word basic: these are designed for people … More Beyond Gadgetology: Basic Concepts for Assessing the Limitations of Digital Methods

Assessment, Number Lust, and Mission Creep

The mania of our time is assessment.  We wish to know what works, what doesn’t, and what we might do differently to improve.  But assessment must be objective in order to avoid being merely subjective, and nothing is more objective, it appears, than a number.  Unfortunately, most things that matter in real life are not readily … More Assessment, Number Lust, and Mission Creep